UChicago College Admissions

traduisez-moi:

I’m ready to go back to school.

Burton-Judson Courts. One of our twelve (soon to be thirteen) residence halls!

This is Hyde Park

UChicago is nestled in Hyde Park, a neighborhood just south of the Chicago Loop. See what the neighborhood we call home has to offer!

57thstreetbooks:

Oh man, now HERE is a #throwbackthursday for ya, from wayyyy back 1 month ago when it was still warm out, stayed light past 2pm, and we hosted the South Side Weekly’s Lit Issue release party. Ah, the halcyon days of summer…

South Side Weekly is a alt-weekly newspaper based out of UChicago that distributes throughout the south side of Chicago, and includes quite a few Chicago undergrads among its writers and editors.

Not bad, but any list that neglects the immortal, dear to my stomach lining, Rajun Cajun is sadly incomplete.

A new restaurant called the Promontory has opened in Hyde Park! It is located right on 53rd street, which is also where other establishments have popped up recently: Chipotle, Ulta, and LA Fitness just to name a few. The restaurant’s low lighting, friendly and attentive staff, and wide variety of food and drink options make for a memorable and sophisticated night out with friends or family.

If you ever get the chance to go to the Promontory, we highly recommend the Spaghetti and Meatballs…it’s phaaaaaanomenal!

themanonfive:

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House in Hyde Park (1963)

themanonfive:

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House in Hyde Park (1963)

57thstreetbooks:

Finely titled & gorgeously designed book of poetry coming next month from Alien vs. Predator author/UChicago grad/mad genius michaelrobbinspoet.

Pre-order here.

Dang that cover is pretty sweet.

calumet412:

Decaying sign on one of the original south-side Harold’s Chicken Shacks, 1986, Chicago.

Harold’s Hyde Park outpost is still a Saturday night staple of student dining on the cheap.

calumet412:

Decaying sign on one of the original south-side Harold’s Chicken Shacks, 1986, Chicago.

Harold’s Hyde Park outpost is still a Saturday night staple of student dining on the cheap.

I watched these very same fireworks from Promontory Point on 51st street!

I watched these very same fireworks from Promontory Point on 51st street!

57thstreetbooks:

jasmined:

57thstreetbooks it’s been too long

We offer much better vacation deals than Kayak.

57thstreetbooks:

jasmined:

57thstreetbooks it’s been too long

We offer much better vacation deals than Kayak.

57thstreetbooks:

It’s happening, folks. Tell your mothers, your brothers, your Levinasian Other (whatever that means). Saturday, August 16th through ??, we’ll be running a massive sidewalk sale at both locations. Prices will drop week by week, the selection of books will change hour by hour, so come early, come often, and get booky with it.

On one hand, I’m disappointed summer is almost over. On the other hand, cheap books at the Sem Co-Op!

57thstreetbooks:

It’s happening, folks. Tell your mothers, your brothers, your Levinasian Other (whatever that means). Saturday, August 16th through ??, we’ll be running a massive sidewalk sale at both locations. Prices will drop week by week, the selection of books will change hour by hour, so come early, come often, and get booky with it.

On one hand, I’m disappointed summer is almost over. On the other hand, cheap books at the Sem Co-Op!

incoming first-year here, best places to eat around campus? (in addition to the Med and Valois, of course)
Anonymous

fyuchicago:

fyuchicago:

  1. Pad See Ew and taro bubble tea @ the Snail (HNNNNNG that’s my shit)
  2. Meat on bread @ Z&H
  3. 3am pie and eggs @ Clarke’s
  4. Froyo with all the toppings @ Z-berry
  5. Mexican food and margs @ Maravillas
  6. Sushi and flat bread pizza @ The Sit Down
  7. Something fancy @ La Petite Folie (make your parents take you)

Lots of decent places to eat in the neighborhood, but those are a few of my faves.

ahem

let’s also not forget the promontory (also make your parents take you)

And let’s certainly not forget the butter chicken and spinach paneer at Rajun Cajun, or “The Rage Cage” as people repeatedly ask me not to call it. Or a 1/2 Regular Combo with mild sauce at Harold’s.

uchicagomag:

TMI on 53rd Street
If Sasha or Malia Obama were to wander past this plaque commemorating their parents’ first kiss, surely they would be justified in reacting with a mortified eyeball roll.
(Photography by Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93)

There’s extra credit for whoever can name the movie the Obamas saw on their first date!

uchicagomag:

TMI on 53rd Street

If Sasha or Malia Obama were to wander past this plaque commemorating their parents’ first kiss, surely they would be justified in reacting with a mortified eyeball roll.

(Photography by Carrie Golus, AB’91, AM’93)

There’s extra credit for whoever can name the movie the Obamas saw on their first date!

Open Produce is the Hyde Park grocery store founded by a Chicago alum that puts all their sales and profit data online for public perusal (they’re also open until 2AM, making them the best destination for late night snack runs). Check ‘em out.

Open Produce is the Hyde Park grocery store founded by a Chicago alum that puts all their sales and profit data online for public perusal (they’re also open until 2AM, making them the best destination for late night snack runs). Check ‘em out.

Memories of the Incurables
I love left-overs. Left-over turkey, post-prandial Thanksgiving style is one of my favorites, for example.
And left-over buildings, remnants of an empire, segments of the past, and all that? Those are the best, my friends.
Young Hall hard on the northeast  corner of the 56th and Ellis is just one remainder, just a solid red brick structure that probably doesn’t warrant a second look for most. Across the way is the inviting physical culture palace known as the Ratner Center and look there: ah yes, it’s Max Palavesky, designed by that gold medal winner, Ricardo Legorreta. And turn around. Sure, we’re back at basic old Young Hall.
The backstory of Young Hall is however much more fascinating than one might expect. It was part of the  Chicago Home for the Incurables. How fatalistic, you say? Agreed. It’s the last remnant of a vast campus created via the last will and testament of Mrs. Clarissa C. Peck, who passed in 1884.
Once upon a time, Young Hall and its surrounding buildings were used by those who were in the last throes of rheumatism and paralysis. What did these true invalids do during their final months, weeks, and day? Well, an 1893 guide to Chicago informs us the grounds featured “a commodious reading-room and the men have a smoking room where they may indulge to their hearts’ content in the use of their favorite brands.” How droll.
So wander on by, give your best to the memories of those who were pegged as incurable a century or so ago. If you’re need of more contemporary medical healing, you can wander on over a few blocks to the south and west. But you already knew that.
———
The last in a weeklong series of guest posts about the “Secrets of UChicago” from Max Grinnell, a proud graduate of the College whose writings have appeared in the Chicago Tribune, the Guardian, Boston Magazine, and other publications. He has taught at the University of Chicago for over a decade and you can follow his musings on his website (www.theurbanologist.com) and via his Twitter feed (@theurbanologist). Thanks, Max!

Memories of the Incurables

I love left-overs. Left-over turkey, post-prandial Thanksgiving style is one of my favorites, for example.

And left-over buildings, remnants of an empire, segments of the past, and all that? Those are the best, my friends.

Young Hall hard on the northeast  corner of the 56th and Ellis is just one remainder, just a solid red brick structure that probably doesn’t warrant a second look for most. Across the way is the inviting physical culture palace known as the Ratner Center and look there: ah yes, it’s Max Palavesky, designed by that gold medal winner, Ricardo Legorreta. And turn around. Sure, we’re back at basic old Young Hall.

The backstory of Young Hall is however much more fascinating than one might expect. It was part of the  Chicago Home for the Incurables. How fatalistic, you say? Agreed. It’s the last remnant of a vast campus created via the last will and testament of Mrs. Clarissa C. Peck, who passed in 1884.

Once upon a time, Young Hall and its surrounding buildings were used by those who were in the last throes of rheumatism and paralysis. What did these true invalids do during their final months, weeks, and day? Well, an 1893 guide to Chicago informs us the grounds featured “a commodious reading-room and the men have a smoking room where they may indulge to their hearts’ content in the use of their favorite brands.” How droll.

So wander on by, give your best to the memories of those who were pegged as incurable a century or so ago. If you’re need of more contemporary medical healing, you can wander on over a few blocks to the south and west. But you already knew that.

———

The last in a weeklong series of guest posts about the “Secrets of UChicago” from Max Grinnell, a proud graduate of the College whose writings have appeared in the Chicago Tribune, the Guardian, Boston Magazine, and other publications. He has taught at the University of Chicago for over a decade and you can follow his musings on his website (www.theurbanologist.com) and via his Twitter feed (@theurbanologist). Thanks, Max!